home tour – july 21st 2019

We are thrilled to announce an exciting collaboration with Lubeznik Center for the Arts [LCA]. We have agreed to host LCA’s Sustaining Members for a series of tours on Sunday, July 21st. There will be three one-hour sessions beginning at 10:00 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Each Sustaining membership includes admission for two people to one of these tours. If spaces remain, we will make them available to other LCA membership levels.

Sustaining Members can RSVP by calling (219) 874-4900 or emailing mshirk@lubeznikcenter.org. If you are not currently a Sustaining Member but wish to attend, you can purchase a Sustaining Membership over the phone, in person or online at www.lubeznikcenter.org

logs to lustrons

Every year Indiana Dunes National Park with Indiana Landmarks host a ‘Logs to Lustrons Tour‘, it takes a full day to get to see all the homes and really is a fantastic event. This was our second year attending, and each year they add a few new homes or there are some amazing updates to learn about. We recommend that you keep an eye out for next years event and buy your tickets, it is typically the first weekend in May. Here are some of our photos from the event. Please excuse us – we were enjoying the narrative too much that we didn’t really get good shots.

Let’s start with our new favorite house in our area  – Read Dunes House. The owners of this home [and within the this home] advocated for the Dunes preservation and successfully so, the Dunes just became the 61st National Park in the USA. Phil Benham Read and his wife Irene commissioned their architect son Herbert P Read to design the weekend house. It is currently managed by the National Park Service and they are hoping to restore it and make it available for rentals. Let’s hope their plan works – it is a gem.

Another highlight on the tour [not all homes are open for interior tours] was the Schulhof Lustron home. What is unique about this Lustron is that it is a three bedroom model, and fewer than 200 models were made. This house was built in 1949, originally it sat on the lakefront, and in 1956 had to be moved due to beach erosion. Lucky it was a Lustrous, they were designed to be moved. Anyone want to help out and lease this one and restore it? Contact the parks for details on their leasing program.

Oops – I guess we shouldn’t be nosey and look in peoples drawers.

Loads of original features – but it needs some serious work to get it back in working order.

OK two more highlights to share. This one we are SUPER excited about. It is stunning.

Right next door to the Lustron, is Dr. John & Gerda Meyer House. Originally built as a one story home in 1961, it had an addition added to it in 1965. The lower level opens onto dune woodlands, and the upper level overlooks Lake Michigan. It was designed by Harold Olin [who also was an advocate for preserving the Indiana Dunes]. What makes us excited about this home, is that it will soon be available for rentals. If you want to get in to be one of the first to stay at this stunning home – you can do so thru this program. We didn’t take any photos that do this place justice – the bedroom is filled with clever storage ideas. such a beautiful home with incredible views – again photos we didn’t take – we were too excited to be able to finally get inside this gem.

This wall panel below is brilliant. Between the two horizontal wood strips are removable glass panels – that you can place art behind, and switch-out. Perfect for displaying photography straight out of the darkroom that is on the right. Downstairs has the original kitchen with another upstairs.

The dining room has panels that can be closed to convert the dining room into a bedroom, and it is cleverly attached to a jack + jill bathroom too.

Lastly, the Solomon Enclave. Party central. These homes / apartments are also on the list for being converted into rentals homes, managed by the National Park Service. Three homes built on a sub-divided lot, with views to the lake. The homes have plenty of the original features in tact, designed for summer vacations there is plenty of glass and screened porches. This will truly make a great spot for family reunions and large gatherings once it is back up and restored. We can’t wait to see life back in these building.

Anyway, just a quick tour – we are not going to share all the details – you just should sign-up and go next year. It really is a great day, and there is a stopping point where you can grab some lunch from the newly opened Goblin & Grocer.

Glass Fence

We have had several requests asking about details on our ‘Glass’ fence. Let us start by pointing out our fence is a ‘fake-glass’ fence – it is actually made from polycarbonate material. We are not ones for long posts so we will break this down fast.

WHY A FENCE

Simple – we added a pool to the side-lot that came with the home, and state law requires the pool to be fenced. We also wanted to allow our dog Banksy to be able to enjoy the outdoors without us worry if he was playing on the road. The fence were were worried about – as we didn’t want to impact the look of the house – distracting from the original design and look of the garden – we started to lose sleep over the fence design.

DESIGN INSPIRATION

Luckily we didn’t need to look too far. We were inspired by our neighbors fence. Their gorgeous fence is an original pool fence to the house and it made from aluminum and actual safety wire glass. The minute we noticed it – we were 1] jealous 2] knew we had to do something in-the-manner-of to be period appropriate. Our landscape designer Julie DeLeon of Groundwork Design also provide some visual inspiration with black metal and glass fences, and we looked to our previous home for ideas too [see here].

MATERIALS

Here is a list of the materials that were purchased / utilized during construction:

  • Fake Glass: Mulit-wall polycarbonate sheeting we purchased through EPlastics, the material was made in Wisconsin, we had it custom cut and shipped direct
  • Posts: Standard 2″ square steel posts painted black [similar material – see here]
  • Post Caps: Plastic you can easily source these [local hardware or amazon]
  • Concrete: Used to set the posts
  • Frames: Steel hot rolled Angle bar [similar materials – see here]
  • Screws: Frames were screwed to the posts so at anytime if needed they can be removed.
  • Gate Hinge: Again nothing custom – readily purchased at hardware store.
  • Gate Handle: Simple and cost effective – here is something similar to what we used
  • Gate Plate: Custom made from plate steel, welded to steel angle bar painted black.

CONSTRUCTION

We had been working with, and still to this day, work with a local General Contractor, Juan Ramirez and his crew RASE Construction LLC – hold our house together and are not afraid of our crazy project requests. We are not handy people, and rely upon this crew to help us with our projects, they figured out how to construct the fence from all the pieces and put it together. The frames were welded off site and everything else was put together onsite. The poly carbonate panels are 3ft wide by 6ft tall, and are set into frames that are 2 panels across, attached to fence posts set every 6ft. We tried to do 9ft wide with 3 panels, but the wind made them too unstable. The rest of the details – to us it was magic. Sorry we are not of much use here as to the ‘how’, we truly are useless even with a hammer.

LESSONS

There was some trial and error with the fence, just like anything, nothing is really ever perfect and you just need to roll with it. Here are a few things we learned:

  1. Polycarbonate delivery was huge, the crates were custom made and hard to crack open – we needed a crew to help us off load a delivery that would normally go to a construction site with forklifts to offload – we had to do it by hand. It can be done, but be prepared with a crew to help you.
  2. Light. The fence creates the most amazing light shows all times of the day. It really obscures detail until you or the object is up close to the fence. You can see movement of people and cars going by, and night the headlights and tail-lights are like moving abstract art. And you can see the garden plantings and their movement too. So far no discoloration to the panels from the light has been observed.
  3. Weather. It is holding up well so far, it went in August 2017 and at time of writing April 2018 it is looking great. It has endured: heavy snow; high winds; tree branches; hot sun; and torrential downpours. So far we are giving it a thumbs up.
  4. Cleaning. It is low maintenance, with the hammered effect to the poly carbonate, to make it opaque it helps hide the dust and the rain splatter. A quick hose down get rid of any bark or soil.
  5. Channels. The polycarbonate is twin-walled so has channels for water and small bugs to make themselves a home. So far – the bugs haven’t been an issue. The first panels that were installed we used silicone and it created condensation issues. There is a tape to seal them that comes with the manufactures recommendation – don’t skip buying it, it seems to work to keep bugs out and condensation a way to escape [see photo below] It was only utilized on the bottom edge of the panels, the rest of the edges are sealed with silicone.

Oops this turned out longer than we thought it would. Well – we hope this helps, and please share your projects if you are inspired to create your own ‘frosted-fake-glass-fence’. And if you have any question please ask away we will do our best to answer your questions based on our project and experience to date.