Screened Porch – The Aviary

The screened in porch, we call ‘The Aviary’ is our favorite spot in the house, it is a vacation just to sip coffee in or listen to the birds in the garden. We are entering into our third season using the porch and it is always evolving. Originally, it was furnished with Woodard ‘Rose Vine‘ outdoor furniture [as pictured below from the real-estate listing].

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These are a few shots just after we closed.

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Whilst we still have the original furniture in storage, we have replaced it with the design classic ‘sculptura’. We mainly switched it because we have always coveted the design pieces, and when we had the perfect spot to put them – we started collecting vintage pieces. They were all white when purchased from etsy + eBay + charish, and we had a local company powder coat them black for us.

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Year-after-year, the furniture remains in the same spot and is divided into two zones: a dining area that is located close to the kitchen; and a lounging area with views over the garden onto the pool. Planters are used to divide the ‘rooms’ up, and this year we are adding ‘flor’ tiles to make a rug. The rug will be placed under the main seating arrangement, just to mix things up, and to make it cozy under our feet when the sun goes down, the terrazzo can feel too cold for most of the year.

For plants, we have found that ferns seem to be the least maintenance, and will tolerate some hot weather and long spells without remembering to water them. The added bonus with the ferns, they can be found in Lowes in April and they last until January when the temps really drop.

The flooring is the original terrazzo Fritz tile, we found a box with some spare tile in the crawl space under the house. We used the same brand to add terrazzo inside.

Back to the Sculptura Chairs – we have been searching for a pattern, or an example of the cushions for the lounge chairs. I was able to buy a set of original pads for the dining table from F&F Vintage. As for the loungers, we had some made, they were expensive and not well constructed. So the search continues … but here are some photos of the original cushions in case anyone is looking for inspiration:

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Even in the winter the space is lovely. We switch out the screened panels back to plexiglass-glass and hope that the ferns make it thru.

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Paul McCobb – Glass Partitions

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One of our favorite features in the house are the Paul MCobb designed glass partitions. There are two of them in the house. The first greets you as you enter the Front Doors, and the other separates the sleeping area from the dressing section in the Master Bedroom. We get requests for detailed shots for inspiration to enable home-owners to recreate the look or idea in their own home, so here we are sharing details.

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The Glass was a collaboration between Blue Ridge Glass Corporation, based in Kingsport – Tennessee, and Paul McCobb – as apart of their patterned glass collection. We haven’t been able to find the company or details on what happened to them [we found this]. If you have any vintage magazines, keep your eyes peeled for some advertisments like the one below, apparently you could mail in and request a ‘project booklet’ for ideas on what to do with the glass.

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We are not handy people with a hammer or any tool for that matter, so we can’t wax poetic on the process or details of construction. We can, however, take pictures and you can share these, or utilize them yourself [hopefully with more skills and technical know-how than us] to translate the construction methods.

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The framework is the same on both sides with the glass sandwiched in-between, and is secured to the ceiling and the floor.

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A few details of the glass itself – it is ridged on one side and smooth on the other.

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We love waking up to see them greeting us in the morning.

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Well – we hope these photographs and brief details help. Ask away with any other questions, and we will try our best to answer them.

Dezeen – Design Magazine

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Thanks Dezeen for the feature. Fingers crossed this story telling will lead us to some new connections with information and/or tales of life in an Alside Home. We are close to finding 30 of the homes .. out of the known 96 that rolled off the production lines and there is a possibility there might be as many at 200. Check out the homes we have found so far – thanks to the power of social media – on our Alside Homes Locator page.

You can read the full article on Dezeen here.

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Indianapolis Monthly – Feb 2018

It is here! Our first feature in print thanks to Indianapolis Monthly – Feb Edition 2018. It is a lovely piece written by Gina Bazer and photography by Bob Coscarelli. Our favorite quote in the article ….

Constructed of steel and aluminum modules in different colors, the Frost House winks at passing drivers like a Mondrian painting in the middle of a forest.

Thanks for the enchanting chat about the house Gina, we had fun reliving the story, and we continue to enjoy finding out more facts – it is like a good archeological dig.

 

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Look for the FEB 2018 Edition on news stands or pick up a copy for your favorite digital reader through an app like Zinio.

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Modernism Week 2018

We are excited to announce that the Frost House has been invited to attend Modernsim Week in Feb 2018. We will be providing a virtual experience on the house in the form of a ‘photography’ rich presentation.

We are seriously so honored to be called, even if we are filling a spot at the last minute for someone that could not longer attend – we will take it. Every time our story is told we hear from people that can provide us with more information about Emil Tessin or Alside Homes Corp. or lead us to finding one of the 96 homes.

HOWEVER, if you are attending Modernism Week – please do come to our talk. Our Mum/Mom’s can’t make it so we would be so grateful if you could make it to fill some seats so we are not talking to an empty room – we might even have a little gift as a token of our appreciation for your attendance. so please follow the link to buy tickets –>

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Here are some details about the event:
“INSTANT HOUSE. It will come delivered in two trailer trucks and within 48 hours will be completely assembled down to the last fixture and appliance.” LIFE Magazine August 18th, 1961.
Join the current owners of The Frost House’, as they share stories of living in an intact 1960’s prefabricated display home’. It is a remarkable time-capsule that is still furnished with its original sales model’ first-edition furniture from Knoll International, original kitchen with case design work by Paul McCobb, appliances, fittings and fixtures — even the original curtains. The home has been relatively untouched since it first went on the market to attract buyers to a new development in Michigan City, Indiana.
It still looks like the sales brochure. The steel, glass and aluminum flat roof home with its baked enamel panels of green, yellow and blue was so astounding to a local doctor that he insisted on buying the display model’ exactly as he experienced it. Dr. Robert Frost and his wife Amelia raised their children there and lived in the home until his death, leaving all the furniture basically where it stood when they bought it. Follow along on the journey to uncover the history of the home’s manufacturer, Alside Homes Corp, and the architect Emil Tessin, the son of Emil Albert Tessin, the legal guardian of Florence Knoll.

Belgium Story: In this unique house, time has stood still for almost 60 years

Thanks to a reader from Belgium, they reached out to inform us that on Jan 6th 2018 a story had been run on ‘The Frost House’. That explains the spike in google search visits from Belgium. The home appeared on Zimmo – from what we can gather is like a Zillow in Belgium, with the headline: In this unique house, time has stood still for almost 60 years.

We didn’t know that they were going to be doing a story, so some of the facts are not quiet right, but none-the-less it is fun to see the home being appreciated around the globe. Oh! And we love that they included some photos of the home from the real estate listing to how things are today – for a comparison.

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Here is the ‘google translate’ of the story from English to Dutch. Of course dome pieces got ‘lost in translation’ but it make for an entertaining read for those that are not so fluent in Dutch:

Bob Coscarelli and Karen Valentine rubbed their hands when they saw this gem. This prefab house from 1958 was then assembled at 48 hours and – due to an impeccable dedication of the previous owners – still looks exactly like it did then. “When we saw the house, we thought it was too good to be true.”

A dream come true.

This house is like a kind of time capsule, where you can not only discover how people lived in the 60s, you can just continue the tradition. This unique find was for the Coscarelli family the perfect end to a laborious house hunt. So they first bought a piece of land to build a house, but they blew the deal at the last minute because of cold fear.

The big disappointment quickly gave way to happiness when they saw this beautiful prefab cottage near Lake Michigan in Indiana (USA). The house was made by the company Alside Homes in 1958 at 48 hours by attaching steel frames of 1.3 square meters to each other with aluminum plates and where the necessary insulation was attached. In itself nothing special, were it not that the house is very unique because the company even before it was big breakthrough, was declared bankrupt. It did not deter the former inhabitants – the Frost family – and they fell in love with the house, including all Knoll’s furniture and the design by former interior architect Paul McCobb.

In Michigan, one Dr. Robert Frost at the time at the house and he not only wanted to buy the house, but also any piece of furniture that could be made by Knoll at the time had to be in it. He lived there with his family for 58 years, until he died in 2016. His wife died at the end of last year. When the Coscarelli family bought the house afterwards, it included the contents of the former owners.

And if you think that all of that has known its best time, you did not know the Frosts. More than five decades, the house was treated with unprecedented love. For example, the house was cleaned several times a day – with the same as when the house was bought – and every piece of furniture in the living room (s) had to be at exactly the same spot after cleaning.

The soundness of old household appliances you hear more often in the elderly from your family, but a whole house that has been inhabited for no less than 58 years by a whole family and where everything seems almost untouched, is unique. When the Coscarelli family moved in, they replaced the taps, floor and dishwasher in the kitchen – the heart of a home. All other devices were retained.

In the bedrooms in the time again stand still. Both the nursery with bunk beds, the master bedroom and the queen room – their nickname for the guest room – have remained almost untouched. For example, even the paint on the doors is still almost 60 years ago and the glass wall of the late interior architect Paul McCobb remained intact.

In 1958 there was even room in a house to relax. For example, a small desk was set up and there was room for a mini-library where you can relax in the evening with a good book. And everything you see is also authentic. From an old painting to a lamp from 1940. Some of the unique gems to preserve a rustic character were not received by the Coscarelli family.

We already take off our hat for the families Frost and Coscarelli. This property is unique and we are fan! You too?

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Here is a link to the article.

Dwell – Collaborative Platform

Dwell recently shared our journey of us finding ‘The Frost House’. It was not a straight-line to this home, it was a somewhat painful and difficult process, whereby we were looking to build our own modern home. If you are not familiar with Dwell, they were put on the map by their magazine that was all about each issue exploring ways in which good design thinking can deliver a better life. They have now transformed into not only a magazine, but a collaborative platform for architects, designers, and enthusiasts – where a global community can share and discover inspiring design.  We were so thankful for them sharing our journey and featuring us in the community, it was so fun to see our little house trending on their site and getting likes + shares + comments from around the globe. Some interactions were a little jarring – negative remarks – that some forgot they were saying about a persons home. We just had to remind ourselves that the home was purchased and decorated to make us comfortable not the readers. If you put yourself out there – you have to be prepared for the negative comments, yet – why is it that people can’t just be kind to one another?, it is much easier to be a critic – not so much to be a creator, let’s just encourage the creators and dreamers, even if you don’t like what has been created or dreamed up as an idea – let it make you think and be thankful for that experience.

Click here to see the full article.

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